Easy Drawstring Bag Tutorial

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I am so excited to share my first little cosplay sewing tutorial with you! Carrying a handbag or backpack with your cosplay is, for most of us, a necessary evil. Conventions usually involve long days, and with that comes the need for water, snacks, badges, and makeup/costume touch-ups, among other things. Even if you are lucky enough to score a room in a host hotel, you still need to carry your badge, phone, ID, and other essentials. A simple drawstring bag is a discreet way to stow those essentials away without detracting from the look of your costume. You can make one to match your costume using leftover fabric, a simple black one, or even out of a cute nerdy print fabric. This tutorial is for a small bag (about 8×10 inches), but you can customize the size to suit your needs. I made mine big enough to hold a bottle of water, but you could make a littler one that is just big enough for your phone/badge/ID.

There are more advanced ways to go about making these, but this is intended to be a beginner level tutorial. I’ve tried to simplify things so that someone with almost no sewing experience could do this. No patterns needed!

  • *1/4 yard fashion fabric (this will be the exterior visible part of your bag, I chose my Hogwarts house colors – Hufflepuff pride!)
  • *1/4 yard lining fabric
  • 56″ inches of silky cording (you can buy packages of this in the jewelry section, or in the trims-by-the-yard at most craft stores)
  • Thread to match fabric
  • Fabric marking pencil
  • Seam Ripper
  • Safety pin
  • Pins
  • Fray Check

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Estimated crafting time: 2 hrs // Skill Level: Beginner/Novice

*Note on fabrics: 1/4 yard is just a reference, but to be honest I’ve always made these with just the scraps I have laying around my studio! Also, for the lining, I recommend a heavyweight, slick lining fabric like taffeta. JoAnn’s sells a one that I love – I can’t remember the name but it’s usually about $9.99 a yard in their Special Occasion fabrics section.

To start, take your fashion fabric (if it is wrinkly, make sure it is ironed flat first!) and lay it flat on your cutting board. You will need 2 rectangles. Measure out your rectangle with your marking pencil (or you can eyeball it, easy to do if you have a rotary cutting board). You can make it any size you like, really, just remember that all of your pieces must be the same size. My pieces were 9″ x 11″ , and when finished my bag was about 8″ x 10″. Cut  two rectangles of this fabric.
Repeat this process for your lining fabric. You can use one of the first rectangles you cut as your “pattern”, if you like.

You should end up with four rectangles: two of your fashion fabric and two of your lining fabric.

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Now comes the sewing bit. Take your two pieces of fashion fabric. Pin them together as pictured below, leaving the top part of the rectangle open. Then take your lining fabric. Pin them together as pictured, leaving the top part open as well as a 3″ inch opening on the lower side of the bag. It doesn’t have to be in an exact spot, just as long as you leave an opening. It may not make sense now, but once you sew everything together, this will be your only way to turn the bag right side out! Sew your pinned parts.

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Once you’ve sewn these parts together, you will have two “pockets”, and your lining (the black one on my project) will have an opening.

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Snip the bottom corners on both your lining and your fashion fabric. This will ensure that the corners of your bag look sharp and tidy when all is said and done.

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Now press the sewn edges of both “pockets” as shown. Again, this is to ensure your seams are all crisp and sharp when the project is completed.

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Next, take your lining pocket and turn it right side out. Your fashion fabric should still be inside out. Take the top opening of your lining pocket and the the top opening of your fashion fabric pocket and pin these together as pictured. The raw edges of both the lining and the fashion fabric should both be visible.

 

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Sew this together.  It should look like this.

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Turn your bag right side out. Straighten everything out. Go ahead and iron all of the seams flat, poking out the corners so they are nice and sharp.

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Return to that little part of the lining we left open, and hand stitch the opening closed. You can do this however neatly you like, since no one will see it. The main thing is that you want to make sure it is closed up tightly – you don’t want your lipstick or your ID slipping through that opening and getting lost between the lining!

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Next up, you are going mark both sides of your bag, at least 1″ inch from the top opening (you could go wider, it depends on how big of a ruffle you want at the top), as pictured. I just used tailor’s chalk for clarity and because my fabric was light-colored, but you can mark this with pins, too. Next, mark another line about 3/4″ (don’t go any narrower than this, you will have a lot of cord to thread through here!) of an inch below this line, as pictured. Sew along these lines around the entire perimeter of your bag. You now have two parallel lines. This is going to be the channel for your drawstring cord.

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Now, carefully make two tiny snips each between your parallel lines by the seam line. Repeat on the other side of bag. You should have four snips. You can either finish these raw cuts but making a little buttonhole stitch by hand with embroidery thread, or if you are in a hurry (as I usually am), you can just dab some Fray Check on the raw cuts. (be careful with Fray Check if your fabric is thin – I accidentally used too much and it ended up seeping through the lining and staining my fashion fabric! woops!)

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Now, take your first piece of cording, cord #1. You are going to thread this through the channel you made. I find it is easiest if I attach a safety pin to the end of the cord to help guide it through the channel. Bring cord #1 allll the way around, back to the notch next to where you started. Pull it out, and bring your two ends together and knot them. You can dab some fray check or melt your knot together with a hot tip to keep the knot from coming undone.

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Starting on the OTHER side of the bag, repeat this. You will end up with loops on each side of your bag. You should be able to securely pull them open and closed with ease.

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There you have it, you now have a handy little bag to match your cosplay! It is easy to adorn with lace, beads, or anything else you like to customize it and match to your cosplay. Be creative and make it yours! Since I need a cute little bag to go with a Victorian Hufflepuff costume I am making, I decided to embellish mine by handstitching some lace and beads on.

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Thanks so much for reading this, I hope some of you found this helpful. If you found it useful, please feel free to let me know and share this link with your friends!

 

Con Survival for Cosplayers: Packing for Con

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pack3Continuing my series of Con Survival for Cosplayers, today I will be covering that dreaded subject: Packing. (Part one is about your Cosplay Repair Kit)

Most cosplayers can relate to rushing to finish your costume before leaving for the con, only to realize that you still have to actually pack everything. Leading up to DragonCon this year, starting about a week out, I saw post after post on Facebook from people who cheerfully posted photos of their neat little R2D2 suitcases with the annoying caption “I’m all packed for DragonCon! Are you?”. Meanwhile, I was buried underneath 15 pounds of velvet, still handstitching linings, hems, and trims and couldn’t even begin to think about the daunting task of packing.

For non-cosplayers, packing for a convention is basically like packing for a normal trip, except with geeky t-shirts and alcohol. For cosplayers, however, we have to consider packing not only 10 times the amount of stuff that a normal, sane con-goer would pack, but we are also packing some of our most precious, valued, and fragile possessions.

I have been very fortunate because up till now, I have been able to drive to all of my favorite conventions. When I bought a new car this year, I upgraded from my tiny Honda Civic to a roomy SUV. Because cosplay. With that said, with a little planning (and Tetris-packing), I still managed to transport insane amounts of stuff with my tiny Honda.

Step 1: Make A Checklist

I’m a big fan of checklists. Start working on your checklist weeks out from the con. That way, you can pull it up whenever you think of something you need to add, and you aren’t being rushed to remember it all at once. This could be via a note on your phone, a paper notebook, or even a word document on your computer. I don’t simply write “Tauriel cosplay”. I make bullet points, itemizing every single item that I use for that costume, right down to any special makeup, prosthetics (and adhesives), hair accessories, and specific underwear that I need for that costume. Everything. It may seem tedious to include the most obvious things, but write it down anyway. All of it. Because the day before the con in the middle of a mad rush, you are going to forget. This is an example of a checklist I made from a past con.

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On that vein, as you are making your list and as you find the time, take those items out of storage whenever you think about them. Start compiling those things in a bin. Spanx that go under that superhero costume? Wig caps that are buried in your makeup drawer? That very specific pair of lucky socks that you HAVE to wear with those boots? Yep, those things. Dig them out and set them aside. You will thank yourself when you are rushing to pack the night before con, because often those things are not obvious and you might not remember them till you’re at the hotel

Step 2: Choose Your Luggage

If you are travelling via car and are bringing more than one or two costumes, I recommend investing in a double-sized black plastic storage bin. These are like the plastic storage bins most cosplayers know and love (I also  recommend), but twice the size and with wheels and a pulley. These retail for anywhere between $25 and $50, depending on where you get them. I got mine from Wal-Mart for $25. This actually fit into the backseat of my two door Honda (with three normal sized tubs in the trunk).

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Bellpeople at hotels always seem super appreciative of our streamlined luggage, since it can be tedious and time-consuming (which means loss of income/tips! ALWAYS tip your bellperson well) to safely load up lots of small items onto a cart. If you are rooming with other people, these can also help keep your stuff more consolidated and protect your costume from being sat on, people throwing their own stuff on top of it, having things spilled/body paint sprayed on it, etc by your roomies. 😉

Another luggage item that I absolutely cannot live without with I am driving to a con is my train case. (You can, of course, travel in style like Joan Holloway from Mad Men and use this as your carry-on when flying. Just remember than many makeup items are considered liquids/gels and you need to make sure everything is organized to be TSA compliant.)

My train case is vintage and similar ones can be found at antique stores and on etsy/ebay, but you can also get a professional makeup case, or get in touch with your inner 90’s kid with a Caboodles case. Just make sure you get one with a tray or some kind of layered organizing feature. I keep all of my hair and makeup supplies for ALL of my costumes as well as my toiletries in here. Mine used to have a mirror, but it broke so I keep a small makeup mirror in here too. Again, it keeps things neatly consolidated and protected both while you travel and in your hotel room, especially if you have roommates. It’s also easy to move around so you can do your makeup by the window or at a table in the room while the bathroom is freed up for other people to use.

Step 3: Protect Your Costumes While Traveling

That brings me to safely packing your costumes for transport. The most disheartening thing that can happen is to arrive at your hotel and open up your luggage only to find that your worbla has become misshapen/broken, a prop has gotten scuffed, or your dress has gotten a killer wrinkle down the front. Here are some tips to keep your costumes protected en route.

pack7For armor/fragile things: I collect those big plastic “bubbles” that come in shipping
boxes. These seem to be non-reactive with paint (as are anti-static dry-cleaner bags rolled up and stuffed into things), so they keep my armor pieces from sticking to or scratching each other. They also provide a little buffer in case of minor impact. If you are travelling by air, you can also wrap clothing items (leggings, t-shirts, etc) and layer them around your fragile things to protect them. There is no guarantee with air travel that nothing will break (always bring your repair kit!), but careful layering can reduce the chances of breakage.Some items do unfortunately just need to be carried by hand.

pack2Sewn Costumes and leather items: For sewn costume and leather items, stuffing them with either tissue paper or dry-cleaner bags helps protect the shape. My Tauriel boots, for example, have a lot of fragile detail work on them, so I stuff them with plastic bags to help keep their shape and retain the integrity of the detail work. Same can be said for certain types of bodices, etc that you don’t want to be crushed. Again, for air travel, you can use clothing items in place of tissue or bags.

Obviously this is not an exhaustive list, but this is what has worked well for me thus far. Hopefully some of these tips help you when thinking ahead to packing for your next convention! Do you have any tips that you’d love to share? Let me know in the comments below!